Blog Archives

Poem: l’rondini di framura (the swallows of framura)

up from africa

for the season

to feast on insects

eating orchid fruits

and to hatch their babies

under drain pipes

and the corners of tunnels.

peaceful jets,

they pitch,

roll,

glide,

and float

down narrow sloping streets

and circle anicient towers.

©- 2014 – Vittoria repetto

poem: the protector


after mamma died,

nonna would sleep with me

in the big bed

in my parent’s apt.

dad coming home

after the restaurant closed

slept in my old bed.

as a teen

i wanted my own space

but had none.

i sometimes woke nonna up suddenly

as i in an adolescent sex dream

grabbed her.

and in the summer,

she liked the a.c. high

and i didn’t.

years after she died,

an old friend of nonna’s told me

nonna had heard

of widowers taking their daughters

and though she thought

dad was not the type,

she was going to make sure.

©- 2014 – Vittoria repetto

a poem of thanks

in my 20’s,
coming home
3am from the dyke bar
i climb the stairs up from dekalb station.
a monarch butterfly flutters on the stair lights;
lost from its course.
thinking someone might hurt it,
i wait ‘til it closes
its wings together,
softly grab the paired wings
wait for it to relax its legs;
once taught to me by the old italian guy
who grew morning glories
next to the bocce court on leroy
when i was a kid.
i cup the monarch in my hands like a prayer.
out on the street, 3 young black guys
coming from where i need to go say
hey dyke!
where you going, dyke!
i figure i’m in trouble
then i remember
i still have the butterfly
and need it let it go.
i turn,
face my future beaters,
lift buddhist prayer hands to my face,
open and push the butterfly away.
it flies towards their faces.
the 3 guys duck,
confused and startled.
as the monarch goes safely to its course,
i too
go safely home.

©- 2014 – Vittoria repetto

poem: summer 2014 – chinatown park

80 degrees

and the water games begin:

ballons and space guns

block vs block,

girls vs. boys,

b ball team vs. b ball team

run, throw, retreat,

repeat.

in their enthusiasm,

they rain

near misses on the daily bench sitters.

an old chinese woman,

resting from her collection

of discarded water bottles,

yells her distain.

©- 2014 – Vittoria repetto

poem for nonna

today’s a sunny day, i’m thinking of you

you coming down the street with bundles

me with friends

you smile, say hello to my friends

and then the rest of the conversation is in italian

like you don’t know how to say it in english.

i remember you working in zampieri’s bakery

you would say yes sir to the women

no matter how many times i said

nonna say yes madam or yes miss.

today trying to read a italian newspaper

i’m thinking of you

how you argued with mama and dad

mama wanting not to teach me italian

growing up in world war 2

they weren’t to speak the language of the enemy

and dad wanting to teach me the genovese dialect

but you won out, it would be proper italian

but you always said

my italian grammar was bad

and i should have taken italian

but i thought french was cool for a english major

and i fiqured

reading dante in translation would be good enough

and your leftist guinea dyke granddaughter

was too busy fighting for

women and gays and colors

too busy hiding from her guinea self

to understand what i was losing

today, reading dad’s brain MRI report

i’m thinking of you

the massive stroke

one minute standing, the next dead

how you didn’t die in a hospital

tubes up your nose

your spirit dying

it frightened you so

that day

in the middle of my crying

this agnostic looked up to the heavens

and thanked whoever

for taking you quick

for not putting you in that hospital bed.

©- 2003 – Vittoria repetto

TUES 5/27 Linda Lerner & Cynsei read at Bluestocking’s Women/Trans Poetry Jam

Women’s & Trans’ Poetry Jam & Open Mike

Tuesday May 27th 7pm – 9pm

Feature Writers: Linda Lerner & Cynsei

Linda Lerner’s recent chapbook, Ding Dong the Bell Pussy in the Well uses nursery rhymes as a spring board for her to jump into subjects she has been dealing with–relationship games, the struggles of being an artist, daily life in New York city.

Cynsei’s poetry and rhythms are moments – moments of lust, mania, depression, love, oppression and compounding isms, and recollections – all wrapped together neatly inside her black token code-switching and bohemian demeanor.

$5 suggested donation
This series, started in 1999, is hosted by Vittoria repetto – the hardest working guinea butch dyke poet on the lower east side

Bluestockings Bookstore
172 Allen St.
(between Staton & Rivington)
1 1/2 blocks south from E.Houston
NYC
212-777-6028
info@bluestockings.com

http://www.bluestockings.com/

Open mike ( for women & trans) – sign-up at 7 pm – 8 minute limit
Bring your poetry, your prose, your songs, and your spoken word.

Take V or F train to 2nd Ave. and exit from the 1st Ave exit and walk south down Allen St. (aka. 1st Ave) 1 ½ blocks to the store.

Poem: saving the best for last


nonna once told me
when mamma was a child
one day during sunday dinner,
nonna noticed a slice of salami under her plate,
nonna asked why.
mamma said she saved the salami
so she have it for last
leaving the best taste in her mouth.
today eating an italian pizza
(not an italian american one)
i eat the crust first,
leaving the best for last,
and eating it with a knife and fork.

@2014 – Vittoria repetto

Tues 4/29 Claudia Manley & Miriam Stanley read at Bluestocking’s Women/Trans Poetry Jam

Women’s & Trans’ Poetry Jam & Open Mike

Tuesday April 29th 7pm – 9pm

Feature Writers: Claudia Manley & Miriam Stanley

Claudia Manley’s stories often explore themes of disconnection, displaced anxiety, and communication breakdowns. They frequently play with the injection of the fantastic or the bizarre into the mundane and everyday.

Miriam Stanley’s poetry is affeected by the confluence of religion and gender. she also writes about aging as a woman in America.

$5 suggested donation
This series, started in 1999, is hosted by Vittoria repetto – the hardest working guinea butch dyke poet on the lower east side

Bluestockings Bookstore
172 Allen St.
(between Staton & Rivington)
1 1/2 blocks south from E.Houston
NYC
212-777-6028
info@bluestockings.com

http://www.bluestockings.com/

Open mike ( for women & trans) – sign-up at 7 pm – 8 minute limit
Bring your poetry, your prose, your songs, and your spoken word.

Take V or F train to 2nd Ave. and exit from the 1st Ave exit and walk south down Allen St. (aka. 1st Ave) 1 ½ blocks to the store.

Poetry Book: Not Just A Personal Ad

NOT JUST A PERSONAL AD
Poetry by
VITTORIA REPETTO

published by Guernica Editions Inc.
ISBN 978-1-55071-244-5 84 pages $13

Poetry that eroticizes simple household chores & casts a direct and witty eye on life’s complexity

“My joy in reading these poems was Repetto’s rebel energy. She revels in her lust without avoiding her history. This is also a woman of courage as she negotiates the complexities of a multicultural existence. She tunes in to people who ride in her cab; she loves the city and the love of women. For her sex is freedom to indulge her desire; it is not possessive but an exchange of pleasure. Growing up in an age when all things sexual were disguised in metaphor, or never mentioned. I found her candor refreshing and stripped of anxiety.”
Chuck Forester – Lambda Book Report Winter 2007 Page 30

“Poems of intense sensibility and gorgeous imagery are a rarity these days; but this book of verse by a distinctly working class, distinctly lesbian, and distinctly Italian American voice is a must for all readers of good poetry.”
Rigoberto Gonzalez – Lambda Book Report – Fall 2006

Vittoria repetto is an energetic and passionate voice in Italian American poetry. Honest and clear, this brave poet knows how to make the world spin. At the same time, she is able to root her poems in the world of lower Manhattan where she grew up and still lives.
Maria Mazziotti Gillan

This collection of poems manifests a genuine sensibility interacting with a striking poetic gift. The meld is seamless. Repetto uses contemporary American idiom with a skill that approximates Dante’s with the Tuscan dialect.
Anthony Bardusk

“Her poetry has what T.S. Eliot and Wallace Stevens and the rest of them lack, clinging as they all do to their elitist view of poetry. I’d say she’s exactly what poetry needs — she returns it to the people.”
Edward Field

Nominated for the 2007 Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry

Available at http://bluestockings.com
and at

Poem: Blue Eyes

her eyes are blue
robins cover their eggs
with their wings in shame
her eyes are blue
blue bonnets in a field
close in disgrace
her eyes are blue
the summer sky covers itself
with clouds
her eyes are blue
the mediterranean sea
tosses itself
on italian shores
and groans

@2002 – Vittoria repetto

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